Introduction

Photo of myself on Bald Mountain in the Sierra National Forest

Hello Class! I’m Joelle Cabral, I live in Los Angeles and I currently teach Toddlers at a private k-12 school! I am working towards my Bachelors in Education and I hope to teach 3rd grade. I love the outdoors, going camping, going to the beach, and anything Disney.

I have been volunteering at my school and mentoring with the Kindergarten teacher, and was able to be in the classroom during science time, and so I am excited to learn more about the aspects of teaching science and exploring the world around us.

It will be interesting to learn during this time in the world, where we are experiencing self-isolation and social distancing. Students are having to learn online and therefore not having as many chances to have learning moments in the classroom environment.

I hope that my students would enjoy learning and have a sense of discovery on their own. When I was observing a Kindergarten class during their science time, there were so many moments when the students were experimenting where they were so intrigued and filled with a sense of wonder, even if it was something as simple as sink vs. float, they we fully invested in the experiment, and excited to discover the outcome. I hope to be able to provide students with that kind of experience.

I like the experimentation aspect of science that allows students to test, discover, and have a real learning experience. I feel like students learn more when they can test their knowledge, and I feel like science really opens the doors for this kind of learning.

One thought on “Introduction

  1. I’m happy to be in this course with you, Joelle! I agree that one of the strongest aspects of science instruction is the experiment and testing portion where students have the opportunity to see actual results and form conclusions. Science provides the reward of being involved in the steps and outcome of the lesson, which can be powerful and long-lasting to the student. Learning facts about science is interesting, but seeing reactions and testing theories meets more of the multiple intelligences. Thanks for the idea of a sinking and floating experiment for kinder kids, I will be doing that this week with my (now home) son 🙂

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